The Essence of Success Network

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    Snoop Dogg Aims Gun At Clown Dressed As Trump In New Video

     

     

     Snoop Dogg aims a toy gun at a clown dressed as Republican President Donald Trump in a new music video featuring a population of clowns.

    The video was posted Sunday. In it Snoop Dogg shoots at Trump a gun that releases the word “bang.”

    The music video also shows a TV airing a news conference with the headline “Ronald Klump wants to deport all doggs,” airing live from “The Clown House.”

    Most of the people in the video are dressed as clowns aside from Snoop Dogg.

    Actor-comedian Michael Rapaport stars in the clip. He’s pulled over and shot by a police officer, which is filmed by an onlooker.

    The video is for a remixed version of the song “Lavender,” by Canadian group BADBADNOTGOOD featuring Snoop Dogg and Kaytranada.

     


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    International Women's Day: 10 crucial inventions you can thank women for

    1. Stem Cell Isolation

     

    • Invented by: Ann Tsukamoto

    One of the key scientists at the forefront of cancer cure research, Ann Tsukamoto was part of a pioneering pair who gained a patent in 1991 for a process to isolate the human stem cell. Her breakthrough work has led to greater understanding of the blood systems of cancer patients.

     

    2. Beer

     

    • Brewed by: Too many women to name

    According to research by historian Jane Peyton, the business of brewing beer has long been a woman's domain. Research uncovered that about 7000 years ago in ancient taverns in Mesopotamia and Sumeria, women's beer brewing expertise were so highly prized that they were the only ones allowed to make the celebrated drink, and run the drinking establishments.

     

    3. The Fire Escape

     

    • Invented by: Anna Connelly

     

    The fire escape still seen on many buildings today was patented by Anna Connelly in 1897. Anna's model, featuring an external staircase, would become part of the building code throughout the US in the 1900s.

     

    4. Chocolate Chip Cookies

     

    • Invented by: Ruth Wakefield

    In 1930, lodge owner Ruth Wakefield was part way through whipping up a batch of biscuits for guests when she realised she was out of baker's chocolate. Improvising on the hoof, she broke a Nestle chocolate bar into pieces, assuming the chocolate would melt into the mixture. Viola, the chocolate chip biscuit was born.

     

    5. Computer Software

     

    • Invented by: Grace Hopper

     

    Dr Grace Murray Hopper was ironically the first recipient of the Computer Science Man of the Year Award. The computer scientist invented COBOL, the first user-friendly business computer software programme, in the 1950s.
     

    6. Windshield Wiper

     

    • Invented by: Mary Anderson

    After watching countless drivers stopping to clear their windscreens, Anderson decided there had to be a more convenient solution. She developed the windscreen wipers we know today in 1903, and gained the patent for her design in 1905.

     

    7. The Solar Heated Home

     

    • Invented by: Dr. Maria Telkes

    In the 1940s, American inventor Maria Telkes was working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on the university's Solar Energy Research Project. She developed the first solar-heated home with architect Eleanor Raymond.

     

    8. Monopoly

     

    • Invented by: Elizabeth Magie

     

    The next time you sit down with the family for a spin at your favourite board game, think of its inventor Elizabeth Magie. Originally called "The Landlord's Game", Elizabeth created what is now called Monopoly in 1903, as a comment on the effects of land grabbing.

     

    9. Bulletproof vest material

     

    • Invented by: Stephanie Kwolek

    While researching chemical compounds for the DuPont Company, Stephanie Kwolek invented Kevlar, the material widely used in bulletproof vests. She patented the unique fabric in 1966.

     

    10. The Dishwasher

     

    • Invented by:Josephine Cochrane

    In 1886, socialite Josephine Cochrane decided that if she wanted something done right, she had to do it herself. She had had enough of the servants breaking her china, so she invented the world's first dishwasher.

     

     

     

     


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    MOVIE  REVIEW - "LOGAN"

     

     


    MOVIE REVIEW: Logan

    LOGAN

     

    starstarstarstarstar    4 STARS (out of 5)

    Hugh Jackman has been portraying Wolverine for so long now that it will be improbable that anyone ever picks up his claws – and while some of the X-Men adventures that have been brought to the big screen have dipped and succeeded in varying measures, it can hardly be denied that the main draw of the series has become one of modern cinema’s most recognisable icons. While Wolverine’s spin-off movies aimed to showcase Logan’s side of the story as best as they possibly could, they have been met with lukewarm reception – how fitting, therefore, that his supposed final adventure take a stunning swerve into more adult territory that has been largely critically lauded.

    Logan takes place far along the X-Men universe timeline where the eponymous mutant has since exiled himself into a life of driving cars on commission, and where he finds himself holed up looking after an increasingly-ailing Professor Xavier. The former Wolverine’s hideaway, however, doesn’t last long when he is approached by a woman and a young girl, pleading that he takes on one last mission for them. While Logan ignores the pleas, tragedy strikes and a knotted web of mutant testing ends up thrusting the young girl into his supervision, and with her the future of mutantkind.

    Logan - Review

    Logan has been very, very well received by both critics and viewers. It is perhaps all the more shocking to see a comic book inspired movie that is currently sitting within IMDB’s 40 highest-rated films of all time. This, of course, is for good reason. Logan is, perhaps, the first comic book movie to really loosen itself from the tropes and shackles that have threatened their creativity for the longest time. Issues that befell the supposedly gritty Batman V Superman and even X-Men Apocalypse don’t even drift into focus here. Logan is, from a creative and from a storytelling standpoint, in league with movies such as The Dark Knight – however, I am not so keen to revere it as anywhere near Nolan’s Batman standards.

    Jackman’s Logan has grown old and weary, Stewart’s Xavier is aged and failing, and the pair of them wander through the movie knowing that they have at least one last stand (no pun intended) in them before the curtain call. This is a movie that has clearly learned from Deadpool in the sense that profanity and heightened gore can fit into comic book screenplays providing they are used appropriately. As such, Logan is very well made in the sense that it is perhaps the most underplayed ‘hero’ movie you’ll ever see. This, unfortunately, can be to its detriment – while it is unexpectedly heavy, ponderous, often despairing and introspective, it may provide jarring for audiences expecting a third movie for the character in line with the standards of old. Logan is an inherently depressing and therefore somewhat difficult movie to watch – which, rather uniquely, works to both its advantage and its disadvantage.

    While the movie may not be particularly to my personal tastes, it can hardly be denied that this is a curiosity made with intense care and appreciation. Many may not like the direction in which some of the characters are taken – many, too, may not be so comfortable with the film’s final scenes. However, it must be praised as a movie that is somewhat unique in its treatment of the genre and characters that are in play. We have never seen these characters quite like this – this is an extraordinarily wrenching character study that delves deeply while setting up a story that naturally ties together one universe with the beginning of another. The cast is suitably muted and offer little exposition except where needed, and it’s all in all something of a wake-up call for comic book movies in general. If Deadpool set the benchmark for how irreverent they could get and Dark Knight set the benchmark for how intricate stories could be told – Logan surely shows us how intense these worlds can become, and how you can, occasionally, put away big, flashy effects and retreat into character study once in a while.

     

    As a movie – and as an experience – I am not too sure how to grade Logan. Technically, it is very well made, and very well told – and as discussed, it does more than enough to bring new items to the table. Jackman and Stewart are so at home in their characters that their journeys here are genuinely disturbing – and it is perhaps this that leads me to rate the movie a little less gloriously than other critics. While it may be ground-breaking in some ways, it is also a movie that gets perhaps a little too wallowing in its pursuit of its intentions. Logan is not your typical superhero movie. It is dark, it is disturbing, and for any fans of the franchise, it will evoke a multitude of emotions – some may even hate it for what it does to its characters. These reactions, in my opinion, are completely valid – as I produced some of them myself.

    However, as a movie, it is still enjoyable – on a level that it is refreshing, intriguing, and nonetheless heart-rending. While it may be a difficult watch, Logan remains a well-made and well-intentioned movie that will hopefully open up creative doors to other pictures in future. If comic book movies are finally ‘growing up’, we have Logan and Deadpool to thank – and future output from both DC and Marvel have lessons to learn.

     

     
     

  •  

    MOVIE  REVIEW - "LOGAN"

     

     


    MOVIE REVIEW: Logan

    LOGAN

     

    starstarstarstarstar    4 STARS (out of 5)

    Hugh Jackman has been portraying Wolverine for so long now that it will be improbable that anyone ever picks up his claws – and while some of the X-Men adventures that have been brought to the big screen have dipped and succeeded in varying measures, it can hardly be denied that the main draw of the series has become one of modern cinema’s most recognisable icons. While Wolverine’s spin-off movies aimed to showcase Logan’s side of the story as best as they possibly could, they have been met with lukewarm reception – how fitting, therefore, that his supposed final adventure take a stunning swerve into more adult territory that has been largely critically lauded.

    Logan takes place far along the X-Men universe timeline where the eponymous mutant has since exiled himself into a life of driving cars on commission, and where he finds himself holed up looking after an increasingly-ailing Professor Xavier. The former Wolverine’s hideaway, however, doesn’t last long when he is approached by a woman and a young girl, pleading that he takes on one last mission for them. While Logan ignores the pleas, tragedy strikes and a knotted web of mutant testing ends up thrusting the young girl into his supervision, and with her the future of mutantkind.

    Logan - Review

    Logan has been very, very well received by both critics and viewers. It is perhaps all the more shocking to see a comic book inspired movie that is currently sitting within IMDB’s 40 highest-rated films of all time. This, of course, is for good reason. Logan is, perhaps, the first comic book movie to really loosen itself from the tropes and shackles that have threatened their creativity for the longest time. Issues that befell the supposedly gritty Batman V Superman and even X-Men Apocalypse don’t even drift into focus here. Logan is, from a creative and from a storytelling standpoint, in league with movies such as The Dark Knight – however, I am not so keen to revere it as anywhere near Nolan’s Batman standards.

    Jackman’s Logan has grown old and weary, Stewart’s Xavier is aged and failing, and the pair of them wander through the movie knowing that they have at least one last stand (no pun intended) in them before the curtain call. This is a movie that has clearly learned from Deadpool in the sense that profanity and heightened gore can fit into comic book screenplays providing they are used appropriately. As such, Logan is very well made in the sense that it is perhaps the most underplayed ‘hero’ movie you’ll ever see. This, unfortunately, can be to its detriment – while it is unexpectedly heavy, ponderous, often despairing and introspective, it may provide jarring for audiences expecting a third movie for the character in line with the standards of old. Logan is an inherently depressing and therefore somewhat difficult movie to watch – which, rather uniquely, works to both its advantage and its disadvantage.

    While the movie may not be particularly to my personal tastes, it can hardly be denied that this is a curiosity made with intense care and appreciation. Many may not like the direction in which some of the characters are taken – many, too, may not be so comfortable with the film’s final scenes. However, it must be praised as a movie that is somewhat unique in its treatment of the genre and characters that are in play. We have never seen these characters quite like this – this is an extraordinarily wrenching character study that delves deeply while setting up a story that naturally ties together one universe with the beginning of another. The cast is suitably muted and offer little exposition except where needed, and it’s all in all something of a wake-up call for comic book movies in general. If Deadpool set the benchmark for how irreverent they could get and Dark Knight set the benchmark for how intricate stories could be told – Logan surely shows us how intense these worlds can become, and how you can, occasionally, put away big, flashy effects and retreat into character study once in a while.

     

    As a movie – and as an experience – I am not too sure how to grade Logan. Technically, it is very well made, and very well told – and as discussed, it does more than enough to bring new items to the table. Jackman and Stewart are so at home in their characters that their journeys here are genuinely disturbing – and it is perhaps this that leads me to rate the movie a little less gloriously than other critics. While it may be ground-breaking in some ways, it is also a movie that gets perhaps a little too wallowing in its pursuit of its intentions. Logan is not your typical superhero movie. It is dark, it is disturbing, and for any fans of the franchise, it will evoke a multitude of emotions – some may even hate it for what it does to its characters. These reactions, in my opinion, are completely valid – as I produced some of them myself.

    However, as a movie, it is still enjoyable – on a level that it is refreshing, intriguing, and nonetheless heart-rending. While it may be a difficult watch, Logan remains a well-made and well-intentioned movie that will hopefully open up creative doors to other pictures in future. If comic book movies are finally ‘growing up’, we have Logan and Deadpool to thank – and future output from both DC and Marvel have lessons to learn.

     

     
     

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    WikiLeaks reveals CIA trove alleging wide-scale hacking

     

    WikiLeaks published thousands of documents Tuesday described as secret files about CIA hacking tools the government employs to break into users' computers, mobile phones and even smart TVs from companies like Apple, Google, Microsoft and Samsung.

    The documents describe clandestine methods for bypassing or defeating encryption, antivirus tools and other protective security features intended to keep the private information of citizens and corporations safe from prying eyes. U.S. government employees, including President Donald Trump, use many of the same products and internet services purportedly compromised by the tools.

    The documents describe CIA efforts " cooperating with friendly foreign governments and the U.S. National Security Agency " to subvert the world's most popular technology platforms, including Apple's iPhones and iPads, Google's Android phones and the Microsoft Windows operating system for desktop computers and laptops.

    The documents also include discussions about compromising some internet-connected televisions to turn them into listening posts. One document discusses hacking vehicle systems, indicating the CIA's interest in hacking modern cars with sophisticated on-board computers.

    WikiLeaks has a long track record of releasing top secret government documents, and experts who sifted through the material said it appeared legitimate.

    Jonathan Liu, a spokesman for the CIA, said: "We do not comment on the authenticity or content of purported intelligence documents." White House spokesman Sean Spicer also declined comment.

    Missing from WikiLeaks' trove are the actual hacking tools themselves, some of which were developed by government hackers while others were purchased from outsiders. WikiLeaks said it planned to avoid distributing tools "until a consensus emerges" on the political nature of the CIA's program and how such software could be analyzed, disarmed and published.

    Tuesday's disclosure left anxious consumers who use the products with little recourse, since repairing the software vulnerabilities in ways that might block the tools' effectiveness is the responsibility of leading technology companies. The revelations threatened to upend confidence in an Obama-era government program, the Vulnerability Equities Process, under which federal agencies warn technology companies about weaknesses in their software so they can be quickly fixed.

    It was not immediately clear how WikiLeaks obtained the information, and details in the documents could not immediately be verified. WikiLeaks said the material came from "an isolated, high-security network" inside the CIA's Center for Cyber Intelligence but didn't say whether the files were removed by a rogue employee or whether the theft involved hacking a federal contractor working for the CIA or perhaps breaking into a staging server where such information might have been temporarily stored.

    "The archive appears to have been circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive," WikiLeaks said in a statement.

    The tools described in the documents carried bizarre names, including Time Stomper, Fight Club, Jukebox, Bartender, Wild Turkey, Margarita and "RickyBobby," a racecar-driving character in the comedy film, "Talladega Nights."

    That RickyBobby tool, the documents said, was intended to plant and harvest files on computers running "newer versions of Microsoft Windows and Windows Server." It operated "as a lightweight implant for target computers" without raising warnings from antivirus or intrusion-detection software. It took advantage of files Microsoft built into Windows since at least 10 years ago.

    The files include comments by CIA hackers boasting in slang language of their prowess: "You know we got the dankest Trojans and collection tools," one reads.

    The documents show broad exchanges of tools and information among the CIA, NSA and other U.S. intelligence agencies, as well as intelligence services of close allies Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

    WikiLeaks claimed the CIA used both its Langley, Virginia, headquarters and the U.S. consulate in Frankfurt, Germany, as bases for its covert hackers. The AP found that one purported CIA hack that imitates the Domain Name System " the internet's phone book " traced to an internet domain hosted in Germany.

    Jake Williams, a security expert with Augusta, Georgia-based Rendition Infosec who has experience dealing with government hackers, said the files' extensive references to operation security meant they were almost certainly government-backed. "I can't fathom anyone fabricated that amount of operational security concern," he said. "It rings true to me."

    In an unusual move, WikiLeaks said it was withholding some secrets inside the documents. Among them, it said it had withheld details of tens of thousands of "CIA targets and attack machines throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States."

    WikiLeaks also said its data included a "substantial library" of digital espionage techniques borrowed from other countries, including Russia.

    If the authenticity of the documents is officially confirmed, it would represent yet another catastrophic breach for the U.S. intelligence community at the hands of WikiLeaks and its allies, which have repeatedly humbled Washington with the mass release of classified material, including from the State Department and the Pentagon.

    Tuesday's documents purported to be from the CIA's "Embedded Development Branch" discuss techniques for injecting malicious code into computers protected by the personal security products of leading international anti-virus companies. They describe ways to trick anti-virus products from companies including Russia-based Kaspersky Lab, Romania-based BitDefender, Dutch-based AVG Technologies, F-Secure of Finland and Rising Antivirus, a Chinese company.

    In the new trove, programmers also posted instructions for how to access user names and passwords in popular internet browsers like Microsoft Internet Explorer, Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. Under a list of references in one exchange, users were advised: "Be advised, the following may be low traffic sites, sites in which it might be a good idea to disable JavaScript, etc," referring to a widely used internet programming language. "Remember, practice safe browsing, kidz!" they were told.

    Some documents were classified "secret" or "top secret" and not for distribution to foreign nationals. One file said those classifications would protect deployed hacks from being "attributed" to the U.S. government. The practice of attribution, or identifying who was behind an intrusion, has been difficult for investigators probing sophisticated hacks that likely came from powerful nation-states.

     



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